Generic placeholder image

Success For All

The motto of Quality Schools International is “Success For All”. In QSI schools we not only believe in success for all, we make it a reality for the students in our care. QSI schools follow a logical model of education that measures success by the accomplishments and attitudes of its students. We believe that all of our students can succeed, that their successes encourage them to continue in a pattern of success, and that it is the school’s responsibility to provide the conditions for success


Generic placeholder image

Mastery Learning

In mastery learning programs, students are regularly given precise information on their learning process. (Hunter, 1984) This feedback identifies areas of learning needs and offers specific guidance and direction in correcting the errors and overcoming the students' difficulties. Feedback should also reward learning success. Mastery learning adds feedback and correctives in order to increase the efficiency and success of teaching and learning. (Cohen, 1994) Regardless of the initial planning, the curriculum, or the teaching, it is the feedback and correctives that form the foundation of a true mastery learning program.


Generic placeholder image

Exit Outcomes
May 2005

When a student leaves Quality Schools International (QSI), it is purposed that each student demonstrate success in specified general outcomes or behaviors. When a student graduates from a QSI school, these outcomes are built into the graduation requirements and are reflected on both the graduation diploma and the student transcript. These outcomes are also reflected on a continual basis in the student evaluation reports at all age levels.

QSI exit outcomes fall into three categories: Success Orientations, Competencies, and Knowledge. Although there are related and overlapping issues and inter-dependencies among these three categories, they may be identified by the verbs 'to be' (Success Orientations), 'to do' (Competencies), and 'to know' (Knowledge).


Generic placeholder image

Success Orientations

Quality Schools International considers these success orientations to be primary indicators of future success in advanced education, employment, and life in general. Recognition for success in these seven orientations will be given five times during the school year. Teachers, students, and parents will be constantly aware that these are important components of a student's development.

Responsibility for success in these orientations rests first and foremost in the home; however, they will be actively encouraged and taught in virtually all areas of the school curriculum, with a view to making these success orientations a vital part of the students' life patterns. The school's role is to reinforce the parents' efforts. Thus, the home and school, working together, can enhance progress in these universally accepted characteristics of success.

In an attempt to separate academic evaluations from behavioral evaluations, the success orientations will be evaluated independently. Thus, the academic outcomes will be evaluated solely on the basis of student performance on the specified outcomes of the academic areas.

Evaluations of the success orientations will be limited to situations in which the student is under the jurisdiction of the school and will be made by a group of the professional staff for each student. If there is no evidence that a student is unsuccessful in a particular success orientation for an evaluation period, he will be awarded with one success orientation credit which will appear on the status report as an ‘S’, which denotes ‘success’. A student who demonstrates noteworthy or exemplary positive behavior in a success orientation will also receive one success orientation credit, which will appear on the status report with the letter 'E', which denotes 'exemplary'. A student who is not yet successful in a success orientation will not receive the due credit for that period. This will appear on the status report as an ‘N’, which denotes ‘not yet’. The awards given for each student will be reached by a consensus of the appropriate group of professional staff members.

Each of the following seven success orientations is listed with specific related behaviors. These behaviors are to be used as guides to define the meanings of the orientations and to assist the professional staff in issuing awards in the broad categories. The status reports will only include the seven broad categories.


Trustworthiness

The Student Will demonstrate honesty by:

  • habitually telling the truth and avoiding deception
  • telling the truth when negative consequences may follow
  • bringing lost items or money to the teacher or the office
  • being a person who does not cheat on tests
  • being a person who is not involved in theft

The Student Will demonstrate trustworthiness by:

  • following a commitment with the appropriate action
  • promptly accomplishing an errand when requested by a teacher
  • displaying acceptable behavior when not under teacher supervision
  • being a person who is not involved in vandalism

Responsibility

The Student Will demonstrate responsibility by:

  • coming to school and to each class on time except when ill or otherwise excused
  • bringing appropriate books and materials to class
  • consistently completing assigned schoolwork in a timely manner
  • showing organization and cooperation in completing assigned schoolwork in the prescribed manner (such as name, date, and layout included as directed)
  • contributing ideas, reports, research, materials, and/or out-of class involvement that are not assigned
  • taking proper care of materials and equipment
  • taking appropriate action to avoid accidents, to avoid misdeeds, or to aid in a situation of need
  • being careful in making commitments

Concern for Others

The Student Will demonstrate tolerance for those of other nationalities, races, religions, cultures, ages, and mental and physical abilities by:

  • being a person who does not make disparaging remarks concerning those different from himself/herself
  • joining in group activities with those different from themselves
  • having friendly associations with those different from themselves

The Student Will demonstrate acceptance of others, particularly newcomers, by:

  • including them in informal social groups
  • being a person who does not actively exclude individuals from group activities
  • approaching newcomers with a view to making them feel welcome

The Student Will demonstrate concern for others by:

  • avoiding actions or words that hurt another person
  • actions and/or words of support and/or sympathy for those who are unhappy or sad
  • helping others to be successful in their schoolwork, activities, and play
  • displaying unselfish behavior

Independent Endeavor

The Student Will show initiative in engaging in tasks other than those assigned with a view to 'in-depth' study or activity.

The Student Will consistently set goals that include more than the minimum effort needed to complete a task.

The Student Will have the opportunity to pursue a particular interest in an area not in the curriculum or to pursue a curricular area in depth, having a unit outcome created, evaluated, and credentialed.

The Student Will show initiative in using the library and other resources in assignments, projects, and homework.

The Student Will show reasonable self-sufficiency in completing assignments, projects, and homework.


Kindness & Politeness

The Student Will demonstrate kindness by:

  • being a person who does not make remarks that put down another
  • being a person who does not physically abuse others
  • displaying acts of kindness (sympathy, encouragement, helpfulness, patience, etc) toward others, particularly fellow students
  • giving time and resources to help another in need

The Student Will demonstrate politeness by:

  • being a person who does not exhibit rudeness
  • using socially acceptable language
  • displaying acts of courtesy toward others

Group Interaction

The Student Will demonstrate group involvement by actively participating in activities.

The Student Will demonstrate support of leadership by:

  • displaying words and actions that encourage responsible behavior by others
  • displaying words and actions which promote learning in a classroom by others
  • being a person who does not discourage responsible behavior or learning by others
  • assisting the leadership of others by cooperating and being good followers

The Student Will demonstrate support of group activities by:

  • contributing ideas that are related to the goals of the group
  • being a person who does not make negative comments that are not constructive
  • controlling emotions when discussing different points of view
  • displaying kindness when expressing an opinion
  • displaying a cooperative attitude

Aesthetic Appreciation

The Student Will demonstrate an appreciation of nature by:

  • not damaging trees and flowers
  • making positive comments that show appreciation for the beauty of wildlife, mountains, trees, flowers, stars, etc
  • creating artwork that illustrates nature

The Student Will demonstrate an appreciation of orderly surroundings by:

  • voluntarily picking up unsightly litter
  • putting litter in proper receptacles rather than throwing it on the ground
  • keeping areas of work and play reasonably neat

The Student Will demonstrate an appreciation of orderly surroundings by:

  • making positive comments or written reports
  • being a person who does not display negative remarks or actions that show disrespect for such beauty

It is not intended that a student must demonstrate all of the specific behaviors of a particular success orientation in a positive way in order to receive a credit in it. Rather, they are used as guides in defining acceptable behavior and in providing consistency in issuing awards. Some are used to identify exemplary success while others are helpful in identifying when a success credit is to be withheld. A success credit is not withheld for some minor discrepancy. A student must habitually display negative behaviors or have a major behavioral problem in order to have a success credit withheld, and this must be agreed upon by consensus in the appropriate group of professional staff members.

Generic placeholder image

Competencies

In recent decades there has been a tremendous information explosion along with scientific and technological advances. Thus it becomes increasingly important for young people to develop competencies that give the tools to cope with this age. To become productive participants in modern society, our students need to gain skills related to these advances.

Particularly important are the higher order thinking skills. Skills related to the arts and physical fitness are also important with a view to beauty and quality of life. These competencies are taught and evaluated in the school's curriculum.

Each of the following seven competencies is listed with broad descriptions of demonstrations of success. These define in general terms the outcomes considered important which will be taught and encouraged in a QSI school.


Verbal and Written Communication Skills

  • TSW demonstrate effective speech by using correct grammar and sentence structure.
  • TSW demonstrate effective speech by employing reasonable depth in the use of vocabulary.
  • TSW demonstrate effective writing skills in essays, reports, and other written work by using correct grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling.
  • TSW demonstrate effective writing skills in essays, reports, and other written work by careful organization of thoughts and paragraph structure.
  • TSW demonstrate the use of a language other than English by speaking, reading, and writing at a level appropriate for at least two years of secondary level instruction or the equivalent.
  • TSW enhance two-way communications by demonstrating effective listening skills.
  • TSW demonstrate the ability to prepare neat and efficient written communications using a keyboard.
  • TSW demonstrate the ability to obtain information from the library and other sources by conducting research and report writing which reflects sound library and information-gathering skills.

Numeracy and Mathematical Skills

  • TSW demonstrate facility in the use of numbers in counting, measuring, estimating, and telling time.
  • TSW demonstrate computational skills by correctly adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing real numbers.
  • TSW demonstrate computational skills by using an electronic calculator for addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, finding square roots, and finding percentages.
  • TSW correctly use the metric system in measuring length, mass, and volume.
  • TSW use the concepts of fractions, proportions, ratios, decimals, and percents, in practical situations.
  • TSW correctly gather information from graphs and tables.

Fine Arts Skills

  • TSW develop music reading and instrument playing skills at an appropriate level aligned with the student's interest, cultural background, and innate talent.
  • TSW develop skills in art and in crafts at an appropriate level aligned with the student's interest, cultural background, and innate talent.
  • TSW develop skills in drama at an appropriate level aligned with the student's interest, cultural background, and talent.

Commercial Skills

  • TSW correctly use decimal money systems in practical situations (buying, selling, etc.).
  • TSW demonstrate the ability to use a keyboard (with proper typing techniques) in preparing neat and organized written communications and in managing information through the use of computer software.
  • TSW apply knowledge of percents to calculate interest on loans, discounts on purchases, and various taxes.
  • TSW demonstrate proficiency in personal finance skills including banking and budgeting.

Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

  • TSW develop logical thought patterns in solving problems.
  • TSW correctly translate word problems to mathematical terms and equations and then solve the problems.
  • TSW separate information into components and evaluate the use of each component in leading to conclusions or solutions.
  • TSW evaluate various input information and combine the data to lead to conclusions or solutions.
  • TSW build upon facts and knowledge using logical thought patterns in creating new ideas.

Decision-making and Judgment Skills

  • TSW develop a logical approach in making decisions.
  • TSW critically evaluate source materials and ask questions such as 'how?' and 'why?'.
  • TSW develop habits of carefully weighing evidence on all sides of a dispute, problem, or controversy before making a judgment.
  • In making a judgment, TSW carefully examine the evidence with a view to eliminating effects of unfounded prejudices.
  • In making a decision or a judgment, TSW carefully examine information with a view to eliminating effects of unfounded information produced by the famous, the media exalted, or by those swept along in the current of popular appeal.
  • TSW make reasonably accurate estimations for numerical problems and measurements.

Psychomotor Skills

  • TSW participate in physical development activities and demonstrate an appropriate level of coordination, strength, and general physical fitness.
  • TSW participate in one or more lifetime sports and/or physical activities and demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency.
  • TSW participate in one or more team sports and demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency.
  • TSW demonstrate a working proficiency in entering data on a keyboard.
  • TSW demonstrate success in using equipment (scientific, etc.) and tools in accomplishing the task or experiment for which the equipment is designed and in avoiding damage or injury.

Generic placeholder image

Knowledge

In order for a student to develop competencies, there must exist a firm foundation of facts and knowledge. Certain facts must be memorized and used as tools in gaining other knowledge and in developing competencies. Other knowledge is gained by building upon and combining fundamental facts and bits of knowledge. This happens by hearing, seeing, and experiencing in learning situations, followed by practice and repeated exposure. This happens by dialogue, questioning, experimentation, risk-taking, and group activities. This happens by reflection, daydreaming, imagining, visualizing, and inspiration. No one knows all the ways this happens.

In the modern world, there has been a vast explosion of knowledge that continues today! It is impossible to include all knowledge in a school curriculum. Quality Schools International carefully selects knowledge considered essential for a person educated in modern society and concentrates on mastery of these essentials. The theme "LESS IS MORE" is employed which means that it is better to engage in the study of less information and gain mastery with a view to proficient use as applied to higher learning, than it is to "cover" large amounts of information superficially and without mastery.

Each of the following seven areas of knowledge is listed with broad categories of success. These define in general terms the outcomes considered important by Quality Schools International with a view to mastery by all of our students.


English/Literature

  • TSW develop a vocabulary in the English language that enables one to pursue higher education.
  • TSW know the rules of grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.
  • TSW know how to spell correctly the vast majority of words used and how to find correct spellings for others.
  • TSW be familiar with selected literature (English and American) in the English language including fiction, non-fiction, short stories, poetry, and drama.
  • TSW know how to use the library and other sources of information in research and report writing.

Mathematics

  • TSW know number facts (addition and subtraction facts, multiplication tables etc.)
  • TSW demonstrate an understanding of geometrical concepts by solving problems involving geometrical shapes (two and three dimensions), by solving problems involving measurements, and by correctly identifying, defining, and using geometrical terms.
  • TSW demonstrate an understanding of algebra by mastery of algebraic concepts and of solving problems, leading to and including solving problems involving quadratic equations

Science

  • TSW know the basics of physical science including the concepts of and descriptions of motion, force, energy, electromagnetic radiation, atomic structure, chemical reactions, nuclear energy, and elementary astronomy.
  • TSW know the basics of earth science including beginning meteorology, geology, oceanography, and the structure of the earth's surface.
  • TSW know the basics of biological science including botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and models of origins of living things.
  • TSW gain a knowledge of experimental hands-on laboratory procedures which clarify and confirm scientific concepts and which give an ability to make independent laboratory tests and experiments.

Cultural Studies

  • TSW develop a basic knowledge of the political, cultural, economic, and geographic divisions of the world.
  • TSW be familiar with the development of the great civilizations in history, including Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Arab, and Chinese.
  • TSW know different forms of government and relate these to countries in the world.
  • TSW demonstrate an understanding of the economic forces and economic development of the globe and relate them to different areas of the world.
  • TSW be familiar with the development of the United States of America including the main events of its history.
  • TSW be familiar with the history and geography of the country of the school’s location and the geographical area surrounding the country.

Languages other than English

  • TSW develop a vocabulary in at least one language other than English at a level equivalent to or greater than that appropriate for two years of instruction at the secondary school level.
  • TSW know the rules of grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure of the same language under the same conditions as in #1 above.
  • TSW know the script, be able to write, and know how to spell correctly the vast majority of words used in the same language under the same conditions as in #1 above.
  • TSW be familiar with the culture (including selected literature) in the same language under the same conditions as in #1 above.

Creative and Applied Arts

  • TSW be familiar with the history of the development of classical music including a selection of world composers and their works and that of at least one other type of music from any culture.
  • TSW be familiar with the development of an international selection of great art and architectural works.

Personal Health and World Environmental Issues

  • TSW know how to plan a program of exercise and sports activities with a view to lifetime physical fitness.
  • TSW know what constitutes a nutritional and balanced diet and will recognize the dangers of eating disorders.
  • TSW know the facts concerning the harmful effects of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs.
  • TSW be aware of the effects of overpopulation, pollution, depletion of the world's resources, and destruction of wildlife and natural areas.
  • TSW know the habits of good general personal hygiene with a view to the prevention of disease.