IB Diploma Program at QSI Shenzhen 

INTRODUCTION

  • IB is a college-preparatory program recognized worldwide.  It is focused on developing well-rounded students who will be leaders in our global society. While it is hard to compare the rigor of IB to AP to QSI as there are many variables, IB is focused on developing inquirers, and their curriculum reflects this by engaging students in a multitude of ways. Currently, the majority of our Secondary III students are taking IB, but this proportion changes each year, based on the students who apply to the program. We offer a wide range of IB courses that provide great opportunities for students. More information can be found at www.ibo.org

 

APPLYING

  • Although there is no formal application, students must have completed QSI Writing I & II, QSI Literature I & II, and all units from Secondary I and II. Students may apply to the program either as a full-diploma candidate, or a certificate candidate. All students who apply are highly encouraged to complete the full IB Diploma (six IB subjects + core). However, IB Certificates are available for students who wish to complete only selective courses.

 

SELECTING SUBJECTS

  • Choose one course from each of the six groups listed below.
  • Your schedule must include three standard level (SL) courses and 3 higher level (HL) courses. Notice that some subjects are offered only at the standard level.  
  • The Group 6 course may be an art or an elective; you may select an art or your may select an additional science or humanities course. For example, you could take Biology for Group 4 and Chemistry for Group 6. 
  • Your 7th course will be Theory of Knowledge (TOK). Your 8th course should be selected carefully to make sure you have completed all graduation requirements. If all graduation requirements are met, your 8th course may be a study hall. You will meet with an administrator to finalize your course selections the week of February 29.

THE CORE

  • In addition to six academic subjects, candidates for the IB Diploma will participate in three core activities, which include the extended essay (EE), the theory of knowledge course (TOK), and activities focused on creativity, action, and service (CAS).  Certificate candidates may participate in the core activities, but it is not mandatory.

 

THE BILINGUAL DIPLOMA

  • Students may select a second Group 1 subject in place of a Group 2 subject. For example, a student could select English Literature and Korean Literature. This will result in the student earning a bilingual diploma.

 

 

GROUP 1:  Language A 

 

IB English Language and Literature vs. IB English Literature

Both courses are designed for students who have academic experience in English. They should be able to write clear, well-structured, detailed essays.

 

      English Literature (SL / HL) 

 The focus of the literature course is to practice the skill of literary analysis. Students read 10–13 texts, either novels, dramas, poetry, or nonfiction. They look at how the author has used literary techniques (e.g. metaphors, tone, or sentence structure) to achieve an overall purpose. Students write literary analysis papers, and give oral presentations. They must be able to give oral commentaries, and write essays, forming personal interpretations of the literature they read. If you have any further questions about this course, please see Mr. Stoltman.

 

      English Language and Literature (SL / HL)

In Language and Literature, students practice the same skills as students in the literature course. They study two parts (i.e. 50% of the course) focused on literature. In these parts they will read 4–6 texts, either novels, dramas, poetry, or nonfiction. They look at how the author has used literary techniques (e.g. metaphors, tone, or sentence structure) to achieve an overall purpose. However, in Language and Literature, students also have two parts (i.e. the other 50% of the course) focused more on the interaction between language and culture, and language and mass communication. In these units, students explore questions such as how electronic communication is influencing language, or how bias and stereotypes might be presented in political advertisements. The study of language is expanded to include a wide variety of genres, including essays, news articles, advertisements, and other non-traditional texts. Students are required to write a creative assignment, and give oral presentations in addition to the oral commentary and essays. If you have any further questions about this course, please see Mr. Varvel or Mr. Stoltman.

 

 

Literature

Language and Literature

Parts

Four parts—based on literature

Four parts:

  • Two parts based on literature
  • One part—based on the connection between language and mass communication
  • One part—based on the connection between language and cultural context

Skills

Literary analysis:

  • What literary techniques did the writer use? 
  • What effect do those techniques have on the reader?
  • What interpretations can I make about the novel, drama, poetry, etc.?

Literary and Textual analysis:

  • What literary techniques did the writer use?
  • What effect do those techniques have on the reader?
  • How does culture affect language and how does language affect culture?
  • How is media/text manipulated to achieve certain messages?
  • How is culture reflected in language and media?

Materials

  • Higher Level – 13 Literary Texts
  • Standard Level – 10 Literary Texts

 

Novels, dramas, poetry, nonfiction

  • Higher Level—Six Literary Texts plus texts from a variety of sources
  • Standard Level—Four Literary Texts plus texts from a variety of sources

Novels, dramas, poetry, nonfiction

Plus texts from different media, genres, sources

Assessments

  • Paper 1 – Literary analysis
  • Paper 2 – Literary essay
  • Written literary analysis assignment
  • Oral Presentation
  • Oral Commentary
  • Paper 1 – Textual analysis
  • Paper 2 – Literary essay
  • Written creative assignment
  • Oral Presentation
  • Oral Commentary
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Korean Literature (SL/HL)

This course will target comprehension of literature and literature’s themes, oral expression of analyses, independent learning, analyzing, and will closely examine literature works on many levels. The focus of the literature course is to practice the skill of literary analysis. Students read 10–13 texts, either novels, dramas, poetry, or nonfiction. They look at how the author has used literary techniques to achieve an overall purpose. Students write literary analysis papers, and give oral presentations. They must be able to give oral commentaries, and write essays, forming personal interpretations of the literature they read. 

 

 

      Chinese Literature - Mandarin (SL/HL) 

This course will target comprehension of literature and literature’s themes, oral expression of analyses, independent learning, analyzing, and will closely examine literature works on many levels. The focus of the literature course is to practice the skill of literary analysis. Students read 10–13 texts, either novels, dramas, poetry, or nonfiction. They look at how the author has used literary techniques to achieve an overall purpose. Students write literary analysis papers and give oral presentations. They must be able to give oral commentaries, and write essays, forming personal interpretations of the literature they read. 

 

      Self-taught Literature (SL) This self-taught course must be in the student’s first language. It is highly recommended that the student is concurrently enrolled in English Literature, as the tools used to critique literature are needed in the self-taught course.

 

 

 

GROUP 2:  LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

      English B (HL) This class is intended for students who have had some previous experience in learning the language. The range of purposes and situations for using language in the language B courses extends well beyond those for language ab initio. The class is offered only at the higher level, and is focused on improving student’s fluency in reading, writing, listening to, and speaking English.

 

      Chinese B (SL/HL) Intermediate Chinese to improve fluency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. This course will develop students’ linguistic abilities through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills. Recommended for students who can speak fluent Chinese.

 

      Spanish ab initio (SL) Beginning level. This course is offered to students with little or no knowledge of the language. The ab initio course focuses on the basic grammar structures used every day, as well as a cultural understanding of Spanish-speaking countries. The course is taught through a variety of thematic units that cover the most important aspects of the culture.

      Chinese ab initio (SL) Beginning level. IB Mandarin ab initio provides students with opportunities to practice and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive, and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. Some basic Chinese foundation (Pinyin and strokes) are recommended before starting the course. 

 

 

 

 

 

GROUP 3:  INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETY

      History (SL/HL) History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of

recording, reconstructing and interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present. This course aims to promote an understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods, and interpretations. It also helps students to gain a better

understanding of the present through critical reflection upon the past. 20th Century History, focus on communism in crisis, HL-Americas, substitute for US History.

 

      Economics (SL/HL) The study of economics is essentially about dealing with the distribution of resources and which choices are made to satisfy human wants. The course emphasizes microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments, and societies. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development, and environmental sustainability. Substitutes for QSI Economics graduation requirement.

 

 

GROUP 4:  THE EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES

 

      Biology (SL/HL) Biology is the study of living systems from cells to ecosystems. As an experimental science, the laboratory program is a required part of the course.  Students will analyze experimental data, apply theory to lab results, graph and interpret data. The course is divided into several themes, including structure and function, diversity and universality, equilibrium, energy, and evolution of living systems. It is highly recommend that students complete one year of general biology before enrolling for IB Biology. 

 

      Sports, Exercise, Health Science (SL/HL) The sports, exercise, and health science (SEHS) course

incorporates the disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sport, exercise and health. Students will acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and analyze human performance. It is highly recommended that students complete one year of general biology before enrolling in IB Biology. 

 

      Chemistry (SL/HL) Chemistry is the study of matter (atoms and molecules) and the changes it undergoes. Topics such as the organization of the periodic table, different types of chemical reactions, acids and bases, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, equilibrium, and the rates of chemical reactions will be studied. Chemistry is considered the "central science" and anyone who wants to study science or engineering will need a good understanding of chemistry. The course involves equations with dimensional analysis, so good math skills are necessary—although the mathematics in chemistry is less demanding than it is in physics.  Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry.

 

      Physics (SL/HL) Physics is the study of matter, energy, and the ways they interact. It includes topics such as motion, forces, momentum, heat, electromagnetism, particle physics, astronomy, and relativity. A good understanding of physics is necessary for further study in most sciences, or engineering disciplines at university. Physics involves extensive use of equations with dimensional analysis, so strong math skills are necessary. Prerequisite: One year of general physics.

 

 

 

GROUP 5:  MATHEMATICS

 

      Mathematical Studies (SL) The aim of mathematics is to enable students to develop mathematical knowledge, concepts and principles, to develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and to employ and refine the powers of abstraction and generalization. This course is for students planning to follow a humanities/arts route in university. Prerequisite: Algebra.

 

      Mathematics (SL) College prep course covering algebra, trigonometry, calculus, vectors, probability, statistics. Prerequisites: Algebra and Geometry. Strongly recommended to take Algebra II before taking Mathematics SL, but not required.

 

      Mathematics (HL) Recommended for majors related to mathematics; focused on higher order problem solving. Prerequisites: Algebra, Geometry, Algebra II. Strongly recommended to take Precalculus before taking Mathematics HL, but not required.

 

 

GROUP 6:  THE ARTS

 

      Visual Arts (SL/HL) This studio-based course emphasizes both students' creative process and their final artistic product in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arts forms. As students develop their craft they will conduct thoughtful inquiry into their own thinking and art making processes—recording this learning in written and visual formats (Investigative Workbook). Students are expected to be independently motivated as they research the history and practice of a chosen art form across cultures. They will learn how to connect their research to their own work, creating art that expresses personal meaning within a cultural context. In addition to learning how to appreciate and evaluate their own work and that of others, students will be encouraged to stretch and explore their own work and share it with an audience through exhibitions and presentations.

      Music (SL/HL) IB Music focuses on three main areas of study for both HL and SL students: music analysis of different musical genres throughout the world, music composition, and music performance. Students study and analyze a wide variety of music from "Western Classical Music" to "Traditional World Music." Students listen to, analyze, and study recordings, and the historical context of each genre of music to gain in depth understanding of music from around the globe. HL and SL students will also learn to compose and arrange music, ending the course with two or three original student compositions. The final aspect of the course is performance.  Students perform a variety of music, either as solo performers or in school-sponsored ensembles. Students perform selected music at the Winter and Spring Concerts and during recitals throughout the year. Prerequisites of the course are based on instrumental/vocal skill level and teacher recommendation.

      Film (SL/HL) Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The creation, presentation, and study of film require courage, passion and curiosity—curiosity about self and others and the world, about different traditions, techniques and knowledge, about the past and the future, and about the limitless possibilities of human expression through film production. Students learn necessary components to film-making such as film language, theory, analysis and history. The majority of curriculum is spent with the "hands on" film-making process.