Graduate Studies Frequently Asked Questions

How do I apply?

Do I have to be a US Citizen?

The short answer is “no.”  You do not have to be a US citizen to enroll with SUNY Buffalo (although the process is more complicated and time-consuming,) nor do you have to be a US citizen to receive a Master’s Degree from SUNY Buffalo.  However, to receive government issued credentials (administrative, teaching, or otherwise) you may or may not need specific citizenship.  Non-US citizens should consider their personal goals before committing to enrolling and/or taking QSI Graduate Studies courses. Feel free to email the program coordinator at gradstudies@qsi.org to discuss these issues.  

How do I pay?

  • We will submit your name to QSI Finance, and the accountants at headquarters will deduct the payment from your internal account. At the same time, you should inform your school’s accountant who will update your internal account locally.

Must I enroll with SUNY, even if I want to take only one course?

  • Yes. You must enroll with SUNY Buffalo to receive graduate level credit. Note: If you enroll as a non-degree student, you may transfer up to 6 credits only if you change your mind and decide to seek a Master’s Degree.

Is there a list of all courses available through QSI Graduate Studies with SUNY Buffalo?

  • The most recent course catalog is available here.

Why are summer courses held in Kyiv?

  • Until another site is approved by SUNY Buffalo, summer courses must be held in Kyiv, Ukraine. This is due to internal policies at State University of New York, not QSI or QSI Grad Studies.

For the Leadership Cohort, why not align SUNY Buffalo classes with NY?  Why Maine?

NY’s credentialing requirements are not friendly to out-of-state applicants.  Otherwise, we would align our Leadership Cohort coursework with NY requirements.  Maine requirements, however, are more friendly to out-of-state applicants.  There are likely other states, as well, that would be suitable.

QSI Graduate Studies: Leadership Cohort

 Register

2018-2019 Leadership Cohort Course Schedule

Overview

The purpose of the School Leadership Program is to provide the graduate coursework and support that will lead to state-issued leadership credentials.  With these credentials, graduates of the program will possess both the theoretical foundation and proper licensing to pursue leadership positions at schools anywhere, including within QSI and outside of QSI.  Please note that taking leadership courses and/or receiving administrative credentials does NOT guarantee employment as an administrator (within QSI or elsewhere.)

Partnership with SUNY Buffalo State

Graduate level courses are offered in partnership with State University of New York (SUNY Buffalo).  SUNY Buffalo is the largest public university system in the United States and is fully accredited through Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE.)  Any entity that recognizes accredited universities will recognize SUNY Buffalo.  Students who take courses through QSI Graduate Studies must enroll in SUNY Buffalo, and all transcripts and other official records are provided by SUNY Buffalo.  Officials at SUNY Buffalo approve our instructors and each syllabus for each class.

Instructors

Instructors for these courses include experienced, qualified professors from SUNY Buffalo and experienced, qualified instructors in administrative positions in QSI.

Cohort Model

To enhance the educational experience of our students, the School Leadership Program implements a cohort model.  This means that the same group of students start and finish a program together.  Using a cohort model enriches classroom dialogue and provides the opportunity for friendships and camaraderie that last years after completion of the program.  Although students may start and stop the program as they wish, belonging to a cohort provides a healthy amount of pressure not only to finish the program but to finish on-time with the cohort.

Certification

Although there are many credentialing agencies in existence, including each of the 50 states in the United States and credentialing agencies outside the United States, QSI Graduate Studies researched and chose one particular agency, which is Maine’s Department of Education.  This agency was chosen for its flexibility with regard to out-of-state applicants.  Undoubtedly, there are many other states and agencies that may be used by a student, and any student can seek credentials from wherever he/she chooses.  Although the Grad Studies program will provide advice and counseling to anyone enrolled in the program, Maine’s credentialing procedures are most familiar.  Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the individual to obtain credentials.  Neither QSI Grad Studies nor SUNY Buffalo can grant or guarantee credentials.  Only the credentialing agency can provide credentials.

Please review and maintain familiarity with Maine’s administrative certification requirements or other certifying agency of your choice.

Registration

Click here to register for any QSI Graduate Studies courses/cohorts.

Path to Leadership Credentials

Path to Building Administrator Certificate (040 – Maine DoE) & Assistant Building Administrator Certificate (045 – Maine DoE) — Both certificates require a Bachelor’s degree, 3 years of teaching experience, and a criminal record check.  There are three other courses required:  Federal & Maine Civil Rights and Education Laws, Special Education Law, and Teaching Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom (SUNY Buffalo’s EDU 577.)  All three of these courses can be taken through QSI Graduate Studies or alternatively through Maine Educators Consortium.  Building Administrator also requires a Master’s degree.  Typically, all leadership courses are offered online (even summer courses.)  

Step 1:  Enroll in SUNY Buffalo (online) and register with QSI Graduate Studies

Step 2:  1st course:  EDL 631:  Supervision of Teaching

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Supervision and evaluation of personnel

Step 3:  2nd course:  EDL 704:  Seminar in Educational Change

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Organizational theory and planning

***At this point, students seeking Certificate 045 have the leadership coursework needed to apply for the one year conditional Assistant Building Administrator Certificate.  A three credit course in Teaching Exceptional Students in the Regular Classroom is required as well (QSI Grad Studies EDU 577 or other course.)  The conditional certificate will be issued with proof of employment as an administrator.***

Step 4:  3rd course:  EDU 596:  Federal and Maine Civil Rights and Education Laws

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Federal and Maine Civil Rights and Education Laws

Step 5:  4th course:  EDU 596:  Special Education Law

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Special education law

***At this point, students seeking 045 Assistant Building Administrator have the coursework needed to receive the 5 year 045 certificate.***

Step 6:  5th course:  EDL 607:  Site-Based Leadership

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Educational leadership

Step 7:  6th course:  EDL 630:  Curriculum Leadership

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Curriculum development

Step 8:  7th course:  EDL 606:  School-community relations (to be revised)

  1. Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Community relations

***At this point, students seeking Certificate 040 have the coursework needed to apply for the one year Building Administrator Certificate***

***Also at this point, students seeking a Master’s Degree in Multidisciplinary Studies would need to complete one additional course with QSI Grad Studies (EDU 577 or another course) plus two research / thesis courses with SUNY (SPF 689 Methods and Techniques of Educational Research and EDU 690 Master’s Project) for a total of 30 graduate credits***

Please note that taking leadership courses and/or receiving administrative credentials does NOT guarantee employment as an administrator (within QSI or elsewhere.)

2018-2019 Leadership Cohort Course Schedule

Register for the Leadership Cohort

  • Fall 2018:  EDL 631 Supervision of Teaching — Principles of supervision: classroom observation; evaluating teaching; effect of teachers’ purposes and research on choice of subject matter and teaching procedures; teacher pupil relationships; group and individual conferences; induction of new teachers; intervisitation; demonstration teaching; teachers’ meetings; bulletins; workshops; evaluation of programs.
    • Instructor:  Dr. Carol Alderman began her education career as a high school biology teacher in Mississippi, after working as a clinical medical technologist for five years. During her 10 years in the classroom she was recognized by the National Association of Biology Teachers as Mississippi’s Outstanding Biology Teacher (1993), by Tandy Technology as one of the top 100 U.S. teachers of math, science and technology (1994), and by the National Science Foundation as a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching (1995). She spent the next 14 years as administrator, beginning as a high school assistant principal and moving to the district level where she served as director for curriculum and instruction, assessment, accreditation, professional development, and instructional technology. From 2004-2008, Dr. Alderman served as Executive Director of the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science, a state-supported residential school for intellectually gifted juniors and seniors. Since retiring in 2008, Dr. Alderman has worked as a school improvement consultant in Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Alabama. She has taught graduate level courses in curriculum and leadership and currently serves as an adjunct instructor in the International Graduate Program for Educators at the State University of New York at Buffalo.
    • Method of instruction:  Online
    • Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement: Supervision and evaluation of personnel
  • Spring 2019:  EDL 704:  Seminar in Educational Change — This course examines the process of change, educational change over the last decade, and how change affects all. Topics include qualities and processes that enhance or inhibit change, and personal and systemic change in the educational setting.
    • Instructor:  Dr. Joan Dell Valle — I started my career as a teacher in New York City. After 13 years I moved into our district office as a testing coordinator and ultimately became a curriculum director for the 28 schools in my district. I was in charge of mathematics, science, gifted education, outdoor education, hold over programs, early childhood funded programs, learning styles and health and physical education. I then left the city and took a position as elementary principal where I worked for the next 20 years. Concurrently I worked as a staff developer for the district and taught graduate education courses for several universities. In 2005 I started working for SUNY Buffalo State, in the IGPE program. I am also one of the owners of Core 21 Educational Services, providing online workshops and onsite professional development to schools around the world. Additionally, I am the co-author of “Synergy and Synthesis for Teaching in the 21st Century: A Model for Moving I to Inquiry and Problem Based Learning Without Stress.”. You can also check out our website www.core21.education. It will give you an idea of who I am, and what we do.
    • Method of instruction:  Online
    • Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Organizational theory and planning
  • Summer 2019
    • EDU 594:  Special Education Law
      • Instructor:  To be determined
      • Method of instruction:  Online
      • Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Special education law
    • EDU 594:  Federal and State Civil Rights and Education Laws
      • Instructor:  To be determined
      • Method of instruction:  Online
      • Corresponds to Maine DoE requirement:  Federal and Maine civil rights and education laws

QSI Graduate Studies: General Cohort


The General Cohort is intended for QSI educators either pursuing a Masters Degree or pursuing graduate level classes for a variety of other purposes.


2019-2020 Schedule: REGISTER

  • Fall 2019
    • SPF 500: Multicultural Education (ONLINE General Cohort) Cultural foundations of education, application of relevant findings of the social sciences to problems and issues of education in culturally plural (multiethnic) settings. 
      • Instructor:  Meredith Harbord, Ed.D, an international educator, and adjunct professor for SUNY Buffalo State, teaches courses in Leadership and Curriculum. She is a former curriculum coordinator, Art and Design teacher in International schools. A consultant for Core 21 Educational Services, delivering ethics modules using real life problems based on Design Thinking, Maker Spaces, Holistic Curriculum with brain based learning, and mindfulness advocate. Meredith is currently writing a curriculum book for Middle Years teachers called Design Thinking for schools: Ethical Dilemmas for International Baccalaureate and PLB curriculum frameworks to be published this year by John Catt Educational Limited UK. 
    • EDL 607: Site-Based Leadership (ONLINE Leadership Cohort A) Principles of school administration and leadership; the changing role of site leadership as it relates to the dominant themes of leadership, change, shared decision-making, school characteristics, standards-based education, and student achievement. 
    • EDL 631: Supervision of Teaching (ONLINE Leadership Cohort B – if enough students) Principles of supervision: classroom observation, evaluating teaching, effect of teachers’ purposes and research on choice of subject matter and teaching procedures, teacher/pupil relationships, group and individual conferences, induction of new teachers, inter-visitation, demonstration teaching, teachers’ meetings, bulletins, workshops, evaluation of programs. 
  • Spring 2020 
    • EDU 604: Strategies for Effective Teaching (ONLINE General Cohort) Strategies for improving instruction through informed decision making, with particular emphasis on the essential elements of instruction; the theoretical framework on which the Hunter Model was based and its practical application in the classroom setting. 
      • Instructor: Dr. Ruth Xiaoqing Guo is a professor in the Department of Computer Information Systems at SUNY Buffalo State College. She earned a Ph.D. degree in Technology Studies and an M.A. degree in Education from the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses at SUNY Buffalo State College, USA, Canada, China, Colombia, and is going to teach a course at The English Modern School, Doha, Qatar. Dr. Guo’s research interests include the following: · Integrating technology into curriculum, · Multiple Intelligences, · Digital Divide issues, · Constructivist pedagogy, · Video ethnography, · Multiliteracies, · Information and communication technology (ICT) literacy, · ICT assessment 
    • EDL 630: Curriculum Leadership (ONLINE Leadership Cohort A) Educational leader’s role in the design, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum, focusing on the principles of curriculum leadership; needs assessment, school improvement, curriculum alignment, and evaluation; leadership roles in curricular decision-making are examined in relationship to current research. 
    • EDL 704: Seminar in Educational Change (ONLINE Leadership Cohort B – if enough students) This course examines the process of change, educational change over the last decade, and how change affects all. Topics include qualities and processes that enhance or inhibit change, and personal and systemic change in the educational setting. 
  • Summer 2020 
    • CRS 559: Principles of Creative Problem Solving (SEATED General Cohort) Theory and application of Creative Problem Solving (CPS) process, practice in both individual and group uses for either personal or professional contexts, group work and active participation are expected. 
    • CRS 610: Facilitation of Group Problem Solving (SEATED General Cohort) Advanced strategies for leading small groups through the Creative Problem Solving (CPS) process and mastery of facilitation techniques and skills. Students receive expert feedback on their facilitation skills as they apply creative strategies to real issues, examines conceptual relationships between facilitation, and change leadership. Students develop basic change leadership skills. 
    • EDL 606: School/Community Relations (ONLINE Leadership Cohort A) Educational relevance of involving the greater community (parents, neighborhoods, businesses, etc.) to enhance and support student achievement; organizational relationships between schools within and outside schools; power, multicultural awareness; major opinion leaders; vision and mission articulation; interpersonal skills. 
    • EDU 594: Special Education Law (ONLINE Leadership Cohort B – if enough students) This course examines the legal bases of special education policy.  Students will review legal issues and cases in the United States and in the State of Maine. Legal issues of importance to administrators employed in Maine are studied as well.  Special Education  law topics include Federal law, state law and regulations of concern to the school administrator,  FAPE (free appropriate public education), evaluation and program development, LRE (least restrictive environment), procedural due process, parental and student rights, special education remedies and district liability. Students will have the opportunity to analyze case studies of personal interest.  The course also has a focus on best practices and proactive leadership to prevent litigation. 
    • EDU 594: Federal and State Civil Rights and School Law (ONLINE Leadership Cohort B – if enough students) This course examines the legal bases of public education policy. Students will review legal issues and cases in the United States and in the State of Maine. Legal issues of importance to administrators employed in Maine are studied as well. School law topics include Federal law, state law of concern to the school administrator, teacher and student rights, special education, civil rights, school finance, and district liability. Students will have the opportunity to analyze case studies of personal interest. The course also has a focus on best practices and proactive leadership to prevent litigation. 

2018-2019 Schedule: REGISTER

  • Fall 2018: SPF 611 Evaluation in Education: Background and current status of evaluation, principles, purposes, and procedures of evaluation; effective interpretation and use of evaluative data; methods of recording and reporting pupil progress; standards and benchmarks in education.
  • Spring 2019: EDT 603 Instructional Design and Problem Solving with Technology:  The nature of instructional problems and various approaches to solving instructional problems, including the use of technology.  The systematic design and development of instruction, including the use of technology, to create effective instructional design plans, materials, and modules.
    • Instructor Daniel M. Pardy:  Dan is the District Coordinator for 21st Century Learning at Qatar Foundation Schools in Doha, Qatar, where he leads eLearning and EdTech initiatives across a district of 10 schools. He has been an Adjunct Professor for State University New York for 3 years, and also coordinates the SUNY programme in Doha. Dan also works as a Google Certified Trainer for Google partners and delivers presentations at Summits, Bootcamps and EdCamps around Europe and Asia. Lastly, Dan is passionate about the use of instructional technology and the impact it can have in classroom practise, and employs a research-driven approach to the use of technology when working with schools and educators.
    • Method of Instruction:  Online
  • Summer 2019: Kyiv
    • First Week (June 24 – June 28)
      • EDU 534 The Holistic Currciulum:  Teaching to Both Sides of the Brain:  This course is designed to provide participants with a useful paradigm of teaching and learning that is based on current brain research. An eclectic instructional approach that encourages direct involvement will model many of the brain compatible techniques promulgated in the theory. Students will learn what the latest advances in the neurosciences have discovered about knowledge and skills, creating a curriculum that teaches emotional competency, differentiation, memory, discipline, student motivation, attention, and retention of new material.
      • Instructor: Marilyn Hamot Ryan–During the thirty-five years of practical classroom teaching experience (grades k-8), including fifteen years serving as the Coordinator and teacher of Gifted Programming in New Jersey public schools, and ten years creating and delivering professional development workshops, Marilyn obtained a Master of Science degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in technology. She possesses a strong academic background especially in gifted, talented, and creative education utilizing the most current educational strategies to provide effective teaching for all learners. She is a multi-year state and national award winning educator, including The New Jersey Gifted Educator of the Year, The National Energy Foundation Educator of the Year, and A Bergen County Woman of Distinction. Additionally, she is also a local, state, and national workshop/PD presenter. Since 2010, it’s been Marilyn’s distinct privilege to share knowledge and ideas with our global educators as an Adjunct Professor for the SUNY Buffalo State International Graduate Program for Educators. Presenting and modeling lessons through the use of twenty first century teaching skills ensures that all students will be prepared for life and careers in the ever-changing future. Strategies emphasized in the courses that she teaches for the IGPE include: critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving skills, and communication/media skills. These habits of the mind are the cornerstone of more effective teaching and guarantee educators involved in the graduate program are being rigorously prepared as twenty first century leaders.
      • Method of Instruction:  Seated in Kyiv, Ukraine
    • Second Week (July 1 – July 5)
      • CRS 509 Introduction to the GIfted, Talented and Creative Learner:  Introduction to talent development and creativity in students. Characteristics and identification of academically gifted, creative and talented students from diverse backgrounds and areas of ability who learn at a pace and level that are significantly different than their classmates.
      • Instructor: Marilyn Hamot Ryan–During the thirty-five years of practical classroom teaching experience (grades k-8), including fifteen years serving as the Coordinator and teacher of Gifted Programming in New Jersey public schools, and ten years creating and delivering professional development workshops, Marilyn obtained a Master of Science degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in technology. She possesses a strong academic background especially in gifted, talented, and creative education utilizing the most current educational strategies to provide effective teaching for all learners. She is a multi-year state and national award winning educator, including The New Jersey Gifted Educator of the Year, The National Energy Foundation Educator of the Year, and A Bergen County Woman of Distinction. Additionally, she is also a local, state, and national workshop/PD presenter. Since 2010, it’s been Marilyn’s distinct privilege to share knowledge and ideas with our global educators as an Adjunct Professor for the SUNY Buffalo State International Graduate Program for Educators. Presenting and modeling lessons through the use of twenty first century teaching skills ensures that all students will be prepared for life and careers in the ever-changing future. Strategies emphasized in the courses that she teaches for the IGPE include: critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving skills, and communication/media skills. These habits of the mind are the cornerstone of more effective teaching and guarantee educators involved in the graduate program are being rigorously prepared as twenty first century leaders. Method of Instruction:  Seated in Kyiv, Ukraine

QSI Graduate Studies Program

In partnership with SUNY Buffalo

Schedule of Courses:  View full course descriptions


SemesterCohortModeCodeCourse TitleInstructorStart DateEnd Date
Fall18GeneralOnlineSPF 611Evaluation in EducationDr. Stallworth Oct Dec
Fall18LeadershipOnlineEDL 631Supervision of TeachingDr. Alderman Oct Dec
Spring 19GeneralOnlineEDT 603Instructional Design and Problem Solving with TechnologyDaniel M. Pardy Feb 11Apr 22 
Spring 19General*OnlineEDU 577Teaching Individuals with Exceptionalities in the Regular ClassroomDr. Elswick Feb 25 Apr 19
Spring 19LeadershipOnlineEDL 704Seminar in Educational ChangeDr. Joan Della Valle Feb 1 Mar 31
Summer 19GeneralSeatedEDU 534The Holistic Curriculum:  Teaching to Both Sides of the BrainMarilyn Hamot Ryan Jun 24Jun 28 
Summer 19GeneralSeatedCRS 509Introduction to the Gifted, Talented, and Creative LearnerMarilyn Hamot Ryan Jul 1Jul 5 
Summer 19LeadershipOnlineEDU 594Special Education LawDr. ElswickSummerSummer
Summer 19LeadershipOnlineEDU 594Federal and State Civil Rights and Education LawDr. ElswickSummer Summer
Fall 19GeneralOnlineSPF 500Multicultural EducationDr. HarbordOct 7Dec 6
Fall 19Leadership AOnlineEDL 607Site-based LeadershipSherrye DotsonOct 7Dec 6
Fall 19Leadership BOnlineEDL 631Supervision of Teaching   
Spring 20GeneralOnlineEDU 604Strategies for Effective TeachingDr. GuoFeb 3Apr 3 
Spring 20Leadership AOnlineEDL 630Curriculum Leadership   
Spring 20Leadership BOnlineEDL 704Seminar in Educational Change   
Summer 20GeneralSeatedCRS 559Principles of Creative Problem Solving   
Summer 20GeneralSeatedCRS 610Facilitation of Group Problem Solving   
Summer 20Leadership AOnlineEDL 606School/Community RelationsDr. YutzyJun 1Jul 12 
Summer 20Leadership BOnlineEDU 594Federal and State Civil Rights and School LawDr. ElswickJun 1Jul 12 
Summer 20Leadership BOnlineEDU 594Special Education LawDr. ElswickJun 1Jul 12 

*General Cohort course but required for admin credentials

Program Information:

Overview: Since 2012, QSI has partnered with SUNY Buffalo to provide professional development opportunities to QSI teachers while receiving graduate credit. The benefits of such a program include not only PD opportunities but also opportunities for teachers to fulfill re-certification requirements in an educational environment friendly to mastery teaching principles and other educational philosophies that make QSI a uniquely effective educational institution.

Mission: The mission of the program is to provide graduate-level professional development opportunities to QSI educators –whether they simply wish to grow professionally; to seek a higher degree; or to fulfill re-certification requirements– in an educational environment that stays true to the mission, philosophies, and beliefs held by all QSI schools.

Vision: After establishing the program and demonstrating its value, QSI now wishes to take the program further by providing theme-focused cohorts that specialize in popular areas of education, such as leadership, technology, assessment, etc.

General Cohort: The QSI Graduate Studies Program offers a variety of classes for which students receive graduate level credit through SUNY Buffalo. Typically, 4 classes are offered each calendar year for a total of 12 credit hours possible in a 12 month period. A normal schedule flows as follows:

  • Fall:  Online course for 3 credits
  • Spring:  Online course for 3 credits
  • Summer:  Two courses taught intensively in a classroom environment over the course of two weeks in Kyiv for a total of 6 credits.

The courses offered depend primarily on the demand of the students involved.

Leadership Cohort:  The purpose of the School Leadership Program is to provide the graduate coursework and support that will lead to state-issued leadership credentials. With these credentials, graduates of the program will possess both the theoretical foundation and proper licensing to pursue leadership positions at schools anywhere, including within QSI and outside of QSI.  A normal schedule flows as follows:

  • Fall:  Online course for 3 credits
  • Spring:  Online course for 3 credits
  • Summer:  Two courses taught intensively in a classroom environment over the course of two weeks in Kyiv for a total of 6 credits.

Financial: 

2018:  $600 per course (or $200 per credit hour)
2019:  $660 per course (or $220 per credit hour)
2020:  $735 per course (or $245 per credit hour)

For the summer courses in Kyiv, tuition fees cover the class only and do not include housing, meals, flights, etc. However, affordable options are available in Kyiv.

Register:  You can begin the process here.  Afterwards, be sure to enroll with SUNY Buffalo.  See the FAQs page for more information.

Contact Information: All questions regarding the QSI Graduate Studies Program should be directed to Dr. Mitch Elswick at gradstudies@qsi.org.

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QSI Statement of Commitment to Child Protection

QSI Schools adhere to the CEESA Safeguarding and Child Protection Statement and Commitments as written below.

CEESA Safeguarding and Child Protection Statement

  • Safeguarding and Child Protection is a priority for every CEESA School.
  • CEESA commits to supporting school environments that safeguard children through both prevention and intervention.
  • CEESA works in cooperation with international agencies to ensure standards associated with best practices are regularly reviewed, revised, and applied in all operations, activities, and events.
  • CEESA leaders honor and uphold child protection guidelines and procedures, in partnership with all stakeholders in their respective school communities.

All CEESA schools will:

  • Actively uphold the CEESA Safeguarding and Child Protection Statement.
  • Implement school-based Safeguarding and Child Protection Policies and Procedures that include regular onsite training.
  • Employ safe recruitment practices consistent with Safeguarding and Child Protection Policies.
  • Educate students and adults on Safeguarding and Child Protection.

X

QSI Code of Conduct

Quality Schools International is committed to the safety and protection of children. This Code of Conduct applies to all faculty, staff, employees, and volunteers. The public and private conduct of faculty, staff, employees, students, and volunteers acting on behalf of the school can inspire and motivate those with whom they interact, or can cause great harm if inappropriate. We must, at all times, be aware of the responsibilities that accompany our work. Additionally, members of the school community, including parents, must be aware of the parameters of the Code of Conduct and the expectation of adult behavior toward children within the school community.

  • We should be aware of our own and other persons’ vulnerability, especially when working alone with children and youth, and be particularly aware that we are responsible for maintaining physical, emotional, and sexual boundaries in such interactions. We must not engage in any covert sexual behaviors with those for whom we have responsibility. This includes seductive speech or gestures as well as physical contact that exploits, abuses, or harasses. We are to provide safe environments for children and youth at all school activities, both on and off campus. We ask families to provide safe environments for children at private events as well.
  • We must show prudent discretion before touching another person, especially children and youth, and be aware of how physical touch will be perceived or received, and whether it would be an appropriate expression of greeting, care, concern, or celebration. School personnel and volunteers are prohibited from physical discipline of a child.
  • Physical contact with children can be misconstrued both by the recipient and by those who observe it, and should occur only when completely nonsexual and otherwise appropriate, and never in private. One-on-one meetings with a child or young person are best held in public area; in a room where the interaction can be (or is being) observed; or in a room with the door left open, and another staff member or supervisor is notified about the meeting.
  • We must intervene when there is evidence of, or there is reasonable cause to suspect, that children are being abused in any way. Suspected abuse or neglect must be reported to the appropriate school and local authorities.
  • Faculty, staff, employees, and volunteers should refrain from the illegal possession and/or illegal use of drugs and/or alcohol, and from the use of tobacco products, alcohol and/or drugs when working with children. Adults should never buy alcohol, drugs, cigarettes, videos, or reading material that is inappropriate and give it to young people. Staff members and volunteers should not accept gifts from, or give gifts to, children without the knowledge of their parents or guardians.
  • Communication with children is governed by the key safety concept of transparency. The following steps will reduce the risk of private or otherwise inappropriate communication between parents, administration, teachers, personnel, volunteers, and minors:
    1. Communication between school adults (including volunteers) and minors that is outside the role of the professional or volunteer relationship (teacher, coach, host, etc.) is prohibited.
    2. Where possible, email exchanges between a minor and a person acting on behalf of the school are to be made using a school email address.
    3. Faculty, staff, and volunteers who use any form of online communications including social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and text messaging to communicate with minors may only do so for activities involving school business.

Statement of Acknowledgement of Code of Conduct for Signature

I promise to follow the rules and guidelines in this Code of Conduct as a condition of my providing services to the children and youth participating in QSI programs.

I will:

  • Treat everyone with respect, patience, integrity, courtesy, dignity, and consideration.
  • Never be alone with children and/or youth at school activities without another adult being notified.
  • Use positive reinforcement rather than criticism, competition, or comparison when working with children and/or youth.
  • Maintain appropriate physical boundaries at all times and touch children only in ways that are appropriate, public, and non-sexual.
  • Comply with the mandatory reporting regulations of the school by reporting any suspected child abuse or neglect to the Director.
  • Cooperate fully in any investigation of abuse or neglect of children and/or youth.
  • Protect the child and the child’s family by maintaining confidentiality in the case of a report of misconduct, and refusing to share any details about the report with anyone outside of the school’s Child Protection Team and relevant authorities.

I will not:

  • Touch or speak to a child and/or youth in a sexual or other inappropriate manner.
  • Inflict any physical or emotional abuse such as striking, spanking, shaking, slapping, humiliating, ridiculing, threatening, or degrading children and/or youth.
  • Smoke or use tobacco products, or possess, or be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs at any time while working with children and/or youth.
  • Give a child who is not my own a ride alone in a car, without explicit permission from the child’s parent/guardian.
  • Accepts gifts from or give gifts to children or youth without the knowledge of their parents or guardians.
  • Engage in private communications with children via text messaging, email, Facebook, Twitter or similar forms of electronic or social media except for activities strictly involving school business.
  • Discuss the details of any allegations with anyone outside of the Child Protection Team.

I understand that as a person working with and/or providing services to children and youth under the auspices of Quality Schools International, I am subject to a criminal record background check. My signature on my contract confirms that I have read this Code of Conduct and that as a person working with children and youth, I agree to follow these standards. I understand that any action inconsistent with this Code of Conduct or failure to take action mandated by this Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary action up to and including removal from the school. If a report is made against me, and the allegations are confirmed, the school is bound to share the findings with anyone who inquires for a reference about me.

Standards of Behavior

The primary goal relating to student behavior is to develop a sense of responsibility such that the student develops an internal desire to observe acceptable behavior patterns. The responsibility of obtaining this objective rests first and foremost at home. The school also has a responsibility to work in every possible way toward this goal. The home and school, working as a team, should coordinate efforts. QSI hopes this results in positive attitudes toward the school and country. 

Standards of Behavior 

Standards of behavior are outlined as follows in order for the students and parents to know what is expected and what is emphasized: 

  • Students are expected to be kind to others and should consider the feelings of others. Verbal unkindness and physical abuse are not accepted. 
  • Students are expected to be honest in all matters. 
  • A warm relationship is expected between faculty and students. Student interests, ideas, and opinions are to be heard and students are to be given respect. The teacher has authority when the students are under the school’s jurisdiction. Students are expected to give proper respect to faculty members. Any form of rudeness or insubordination should not be a part of student behavior. 
  • Students are expected to respect school property and property of others. 
  • Students are expected to use proper language. Profane, obscene, and otherwise unacceptable language is not permitted. 
  • Students are expected to attend all classes punctually and regularly. 

Disciplinary Measures 

When a student does not behave in a decent and acceptable manner, the following measures may be taken: 

Teacher-Student: For a minor behavior problem, a word from the teacher may be sufficient. This may be a word of warning or explanation. Repeated behavior of this kind will be dealt with more seriously. 

Teacher-Student-Administration-Parent: More serious behavior problems or repeated minor problems should be brought to the attention of the administration, and in some cases the parents are informed in writing of any action taken. Some possible actions which may be taken: 

Counseling with a view to the following

  • Probing into the reason or reasons for the behavior. 
  • Bringing the student to see that his/her behavior is undesirable. 
  • Bringing the student to have a desire for change. 

Separation for a short time from the class or other environment in which the behavior occurred. 

In all cases, the student should think about his/her behavior and in some cases submit a written commitment with a view to improved behavior. In the event that a student does not fulfill a written commitment, the problem may be dealt with through the following administration measures: 

  • Administration-Student-Parent: Very serious behavior problems or continual repetitive minor misbehavior will be dealt with by the administration. Some possible actions: 
  1. Counseling as suggested above. 
  2. Group conference. 
  3. Suspension from school for a designated period of time. 
  4. Expulsion. 

In all cases of very serious behavior problems, the parents will be notified. 

The History and Origins of QSI

1971 – Present

Sanaa International School opened in September 1971 with four students and grew to over 200 within a few years. The school’s early history is related to the founder’s first assignment in Yemen. In 1966-67, Mr. James E. Gilson was employed as principal of the Yemen-American Cooperative School in Taiz, Yemen. In May of 1967, the American community was evacuated and the school ceased operations. Mr. Gilson, encouraged by the friendliness and hospitality of the people of Yemen, and interested in their culture and history as well as the development of the young republic, had a desire to return. In 1971, after discussions with key people in Sanaa, it became apparent that there was a need for an international school. Therefore, Mr. Gilson accepted a position in Saudi Arabia, hired a teaching couple to go to Yemen, and was able to financially guarantee the first year of Sanaa International School. The school grew to about 25 students in the first year making it possible for Mr. and Mrs. Gilson and their two sons, Marcus and Kevin, to move to Yemen in July 1972.

In 1974, the established Advisory Board composed of leading expatriates and Yemenis, joined by a few others in Sanaa, met and formulated the school’s Articles of Organization and By-Laws. This established the school as a non-profit organization and formed a Board of Directors. Accurate accounting records have been kept throughout the school’s existence. As a non-profit entity, the school has been able to receive grants, loans, and land. As early as 1972, it was foreseen that a purpose-built school should be constructed. After three years of discussions and meetings at many levels, the Yemen Government granted the school its present 35 acres (about 14 hectares) gratis for a period of fifty years. Many individuals of the Yemen Government, the American Government, the United Nations, and the German Government gave considerable assistance in time and influence to obtain land that was occupied on 22 December 1976. Construction began on 1 January 1977. A formal agreement with the Yemen Government was signed on 7 May 1977 that included the land grant. The building program and site development included the school buildings, two water wells, one residential home, a workshop, and playground development. In the fall of 1992, a new domed carpeted auditorium/sports area was put into use.

The educational program has progressed from the philosophy brought by the first teachers to a structured performance-based model first implemented in the fall of 1987 in the secondary section. By the autumn of 1989, the entire school was performance-based. Formal accreditation was granted by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools on 24 April 1987. Sanaa International School continues with a dedicated and caring staff, the most important key to the school’s success.

Quality Schools International has a more recent history. In 1991, the political structure of the world began a rapid transition. Great changes took place in the former USSR and in areas formerly under its sphere of influence. Combining this recent history with experience in the school restructuring process leading to higher success in schools, QSI was launched. Mr. Duane Root and Mr. James Gilson co-founded Quality Schools International as a non-profit educational organization with a view to opportunities in education in new countries. On 13 May of 1991, Mr. Gilson traveled to Albania to have a look at a country just emerging from over 45 years of dictatorial rule. During his time there, he met some key people in the Tirana community and made a decision to begin Tirana International School. Continuing expansion has resulted in an organization that today offers excellence in education in 31 different countries.


Environmental Policy

Environmental Protection Policy 

[This policy was written in 1977 and is outdated by the phrase ‘within the century’. However, with only minor revisions, it is being left as it was to illustrate the foresight of this policy written over a quarter century ago.] 

As part of the instructional program of Sanaa International School, particularly in cultural studies, physical education, and science, emphasis are placed on environmental studies with a view to the concerns of pollution, overpopulation, waste of natural resources, health, etc. It is felt that the pressure of the environmental crisis worldwide makes it imperative that our children have a working understanding of the problems they will face as adult citizens. The following is a summary of the problems that relate to the school’s objectives concerning environmental protection. 

  1. Overpopulation: Students should be made aware of the facts concerning excessive population growth. They should know that unless the explosive world population growth is slowed or stopped altogether, the quality of life will be seriously reduced due to shortage of food and supplies, shortage of space, and unstable political and social institutions. 
  2. Pollution: Problems of the pollution of the environment caused by uncontrolled economic and technological growth should be brought to the attention of the students. The ecological balance of clean air, water, and land should be seen and studied in terms of a student’s own relationship to it. Students should be encouraged to avoid littering at school, home, city, and countryside. 
  3. Resources: An exponential use of the earth’s limited resources by the industrially developed nations is a problem in which each of us participates. Unless our growth-at-all-costs consumer value system is changed to a system of responsible development, man shall not survive his own greed. Students should learn the economics of over-consumption and how to make personal decisions in this area which will positively affect the world’s environment. 
  4. Protection of Wildlife and Natural Areas: Students should know that certain animals are now extinct, that there is a growing number of endangered species, and that if strict protection measures are not taken, much of the earth’s wildlife will have vanished from the earth within the century. They should know, too, that preservation of wildlife means the protection of vast stretches of earth’s forests, seas, lakes, swamps, savannas, and deserts. 
  5. Health: Exercise, proper diet, and avoidance of harmful drugs should be encouraged. Students should have facts on the harmful effects of overeating, excessive drinking of alcoholic beverages, use of tobacco, and use of other harmful drugs. An organized program of exercise is part of the physical education program. Individual sports in which one can participate after youth should be taught as well as major team sports.